The Ballad of Vito Jr. – A Soprano’s Societal Critique

This post was originally published on April 5, 2021 for my Publish0x blog.

I’ve been watching The Sopranos recently. I’ve sorted hated the show after the fourth season, I think, but it was helpful in solidifying again why I don’t want to get married (at least to just one woman, more on that real soon).

I might as well take my shot now before we move onto the main topic, but essentially, I’m impressed that a man could command so much fear, respect, and power out on the streets, as there is a clear order and division among men, but as soon as he gets home, because of marriage, women magically become equal to such powerful men, with license to belittle, along with entitlement to his assets, all without going through the rigorous qualifications that men are subject to for the same status. 

The Sopranos is also a favorite series of one of my MGTOW mentors, Kurama (or Itachi) MGTOW. Earlier today, I watched a video of his, “Clueless Older Men”, and essentially he said that it was older, beta, blue-pill men that created this situation, and have no real solution. I would like to add that they also put pressure on us younger men when we go our own way and choose not play into the status quo. 

The main topic today is about a character named Vito Jr., who I believe exemplifies some of these qualities, and the reaction to his rebellion is a mirror of our society. 

If you haven’t watched the show, even though this spoiler is relevant to the conclusion of an entire saga, it was still only about a side-character, so it’s not that significant if you still want to enjoy the show. 

Vito Jr. is obviously the son of Vito, who was a captain in Tony Soprano’s mafia, until he was discovered to be gay, and was killed by another mafia member who was a relative of his wife. The family obviously took the death and the news of their closeted father quite difficultly. Vito Jr. began to rebel and became a Goth kid.

In response, his mother approached Tony Soprano to help her relocate the family, believing a fresh start would be a solution, and asked for $100,000. 

This price tag is symbolic of the cost that broken homes levy onto society, as the government expends resources to cover what the absent fathers are not, as well as the children being poorly raised and eventually repeating the situation. 

Obviously, this cost was too much for Tony, and so the two clips below are of the relative, and Tony Soprano, trying to talk some sense into Vito Jr. 

In this first clip, the major point is that Vito Jr. has absolved himself of societal shame, which is a key component of going your own way. The criticism from Phil that his appearance makes him “sick” is water off Vito Jr.’s back, and he recognizes that his mother’s suffering is only due to her feelings of embarrassment. 

Vito Jr. is also just a boy, and since his father has been taken away, he does not understand what traditional masculinity is, and doubly so since his father was either bisexual or a closeted gay. Obviously, being straight or gay doesn’t mean one is masculine or not, but I reinforce that the issue at hand is the “traditional” kind.

The second clip is crucial because now that Vito Jr. has been pressured for the second time to man-up for the sake of his mother, he simply answers

“What am I supposed to do about it?” 

Once again, this touches on the fact I mentioned earlier about wives, in that women have no qualifications, and that’s why a boy is instantly promoted to being “Man of the house” with his father’s absence. 

As for his father, although he jokes about him personally, Vito Jr. is actually resentful towards society when he says “someone should have told my father to stop the weird shit.” 

Although his father was punished for his actions by being killed for it, he still had some room to make the choices he wanted, but the repercussions of those actions are picked up by his son. 

Itachi echoed this sentiment in his video as well, on how he feels that he is a “first generation man”, as the beta men of previous generations were given carte blanche and have allowed feminism to flourish and society to degenerate, leaving our generation to clean it up.

When we choose to deviate from that, we’re accused of not being masculine anymore. 

Speaking of “clean up”, this next clip is a bit graphic. 

But it’s important, because the other kids mocking him is reminiscent of society, once again blaming the son for the sins of his father.

Not only did he take a shit as a “fuck you” to society, he also stepped in it, which was supposed to be something called “waffle stomping”, which is when a turd is pressed against a square-holed shower drain gate to make a waffle-like imprint.

Vito Jr. is clogging the drain, impeding the flow of his effort towards a society that has only taken away from him, and is forcing him in roles he doesn’t want to participate in. 

Of course, he is suspended from school because of this, and declares that he won’t be returning, solidifying his resignation from society. 

And how do you think the system is going to respond when you stop paying into it? 

The irony throughout this entire series of clips, is that the two men that were actually responsible for creating this situation that Vito Jr. is in the first place are the ones telling him to clean it up.

This difficult situation was left to a young boy because these two men did not want to pay the price for their actions.

After their empty preaching, they were allowed to walk away and return to their stability. 

It’s the very same thing that happened in Itachi’s video, when the older man called in and told Itachi “don’t worry about it” when Itachi was lamenting over the dangers of dating women in this era. 

It’s the older men that tell us to “man up” and continue to marry women or pay into the system when we have very few good options or outcomes these days. 

But when a character like Vito Jr. chooses to rebel, it is seen as a threat to the older blue pill men’s stability. And thus, Vito Jr. is taken away in the dark of night to a “tough love” camp for troubled children, where he will be under the threat of corporal punishment if he doesn’t conform. 

Apparently, Soprano was actually willing to finance the first plan to move the entire family to Maine, but only through funds he would have acquired through a bet, of which he unfortunately lost.

A $200,000 debt of Soprano’s was also called on during the same time, tightening his pockets even more. So in the end, the cheapest option won out at the expense of this young man. 

This behavior is once again indicative of the frivolous behavior of the older men of yesterday as they took a gamble on enabling feminism, and now it’s our children and assets stolen from us in the dead of night through the family courts.   

A character like Vito Jr. realized quickly that he owed nothing to a society that robbed him, and thus he went his own way. 

This is powerful, and I’d love to end the article on that statement alone, but unfortunately there’s more. 

The Real Lesson 

Although he is inspiring, Vito Jr. still technically lost by having to go to that camp. 

The additional lesson here is that another major skill us MGTOW men must develop is to “ghost in plain sight”, which is the ability to hide our true beliefs and intentions and play it safe while we quietly deploy our exit strategy. 

Showing your cards never wins you rewards or allies, as this case with Vito Jr. aptly demonstrates. 

Luckily for myself, I work a remote job with zero contact between my co-workers and bosses.

However, in the past, I made the mistake of revealing my political ideas and affiliations. 

At one place of work, I told one or two of my friends that I was voting for Donald Trump in 2016, and it was eventually leaked to the entire staff. The day after the election there was a regular staff meeting, but I was getting the evil eye for most of it, and it was a total blindside to me. 

The second instance was when I worked at a college bookstore. Because I have dark skin, a few of my black female co-workers asked me if I was going to watch the Black Panther movie.

I knew it was somewhat of a charged issue, and I hoped that my answer that I simply did not like Marvel films was enough to dispel it, but I then learned that there was an agenda for all Black people to support this movie, regardless of their non-fandom. 

Even further, I told them that I was actually Latino, and was waiting for my “Washington Heights Super Hero” movie (which we sort of got later with Miles Morales’ in Spider-Man: Into the Spider-verse (which was an awesome film by the way). But of course, they had an answer to that too, since of course they were also intersectional feminists, so one cause scratches the back of the other.

Because of this debate, another friend of mine approached me later because there was now a rumor that I was self-hating of my skin color. 

Nothing was gained at all by showing my true colors. I just made enemies. 

My disdain for their institutions makes it so difficult for me to hold back, and it’s definitely something I need to work on, especially since I’ll be heading back to college in the Fall. 

Speaking of which, in one of my recent classes last semester, my white* teacher was recalling how she missed going to her gym, as there were many non-white members there, which was good because “white people suck.” 

Even though I’m non-white myself, I felt horrible for the two white students that were in the class, and I decided to stand up for them and tell the teacher that I was uncomfortable with her statement. Luckily, I actually did get some support from another student (she was also Dominican like me). If Campus was in person and not online, I probably would have dated her. 

But did the white students send me a private message to thank me? No. 

Did the professor put that event in the memory shredder and bash white people again? Yes. 

Unfortunately I don’t remember the context too well, but I believe I stood up to her a second time, when I told her that being half-Jewish is a conflict of interest when critiquing white culture, as Jewish culture is off-limits and so they would be the last ones standing if we removed all whites. She couldn’t help but agree with this. 

Funnily enough, you wouldn’t believe that an Art History class would actually feature an assignment in which the class would have to make a modern political meme, but this is the state of American Education.

It wasn’t explicitly stated, but in her heart, she really wanted a gallery of Trump memes, as this was after Biden’s inauguration.

But as a Trump voter (of 2016, I didn’t give a fuck about 2020, maybe I’ll write about that in complete detail later too), I dodged this draft and made one related to NYC politics and took a shot at our mayor, but still stayed on the left by supporting Andrew Yang in my meme. 

After this, I made sure to suck up the professor where I could, and in the end I absolutely crushed the class with the highest score I had for any course ever I’ve taken. Well, it was Art History, after all. 

I’m not sure if I’ll be able to ghost properly during my last two years left of college, but something I did say in that Art class might reveal a way for me to have a chance. 

The professor did ask us about politics, I believe after the Storming of the US Capitol, and I remember answering 

Indifferent. I’m moving to Japan. 

So, I believe we can embrace ghosting in plain sight without too much internal resistance if we have something truly greater to look forward to. 

I don’t remember which chapter of The 12 Rules of Monk Mode I wrote this in, but I believe I mentioned that dependency is the root of all evil in this world, because we hold contempt or resentment for others when we can’t walk away from the situation. 

I have disdain for American society and politics because I’m dwelling in it, but if I truly start to feel that I will soon be free from it by focusing on Japan, (or on a deeper level, being MGTOW level 5), then that’s when I can truly have the level of apathy that is necessary to be able to lie to my enemies without it affecting my soul, as it’s no longer an issue I apply any morality to without actually having a dog in the fight. 

I personally am still wrestling with a Red Pill (or Black Pill) that the majority of humanity is actually irredeemable, and perhaps reincarnation being real explains this, so that people are born to play out their role, thus, I should no longer interfere. 

But that’s a topic for another day, I suppose. 

I’ll See You On the Far Side… – Monk Moon Base

Published by moonbasemgtow

Mid-twenties, going my own way. Filling the gap of Monk Mode content within MGTOW. Other interests in art, health, fitness, meditation, esoteric philosophy and productivity.

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